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Description
  • #1 Indigo Bunting Male
    Small male finch with brilliant, almost iridescent , blue plummage. The crown is darker blue with a purple tint. Found from Arizona, Texas, the gulf coast, Florida north to Saskatchewan and New Brunswick. 
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #2 Common Yellowthroat Male
    Small skulking warbler found throughout North America
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #3 Baltimore Oriole Male
    Small Oriole, mostly bright orange with black hood and back. Breeds in much of Canada and the United States East of the Rockies
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #4 Yellow Warbler
    Small warbler with bright olive-yellow upperparts and brilliant yellow underparts with rust-brown streaks on breast and sides. Found throughout North America, Central America, the Caribbean, South America
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #5 American Redstart Male
    Medium-sized warblere withblack upper parts and hood, distictive orange-red patches on wings, sides, and long, fanned-tail with white under-parts
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #6 Black-and-White Warbler Male
    Small warbler found throughout most of the Eastern United States
    1424,960
    Direct Sale
  • #7 Baltimore Oriole, Female
    Female is similar to male color but less brilliant
    647,960
    Direct Sale
  • #8 Blue Grosbeak, Female
    1424,960
    Direct Sale
  • #9 Painted Bunting Female
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #10 Summer Tanager Female
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #11 Orchard Oriole, Male
    647,960
    Direct Sale
  • #12 Summer Tanager, Male
    1423,960
    Direct Sale
  • #13 Magnolia Warbler Male
    1424,960
    Direct Sale
  • #14 Painted Bunting Male
    1424,960
    Direct Sale
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MIGRATION #1-16
All of the birds in this portfolio were photographed in April 2019 on the Texas Gulf Coast South of Galvaston.  Neotropical migrants from central and South America arrive along the Upper Texas Gulf Coast in early March to mid May after an 18 hour flight over the Gulf of Mexico.  They put down to refuel and take on fresh water before their nightly flight continues on to nesting in the forests of Eastern North America.  Please go to houstonaudubon.org for more information.
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MIGRATION #1-16
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